WforC.org

 Writing forCollege.org

  

Inver Hills Community College

 

Home & Contents                       Basics                       College Writing                       www.OnlineGrammar.org

                  

                                   

PARTS & SECTIONS

Click on any  part or section below:

Part I. Basics/Process

  A. Chapters 1-6: Start

  B. Ch. 7-13: Organize

  C. Ch. 14-20: Revise/Edit

Part II. College Writing

   D. Ch. 21-23: What Is It?

   E. Ch. 24-30: Write on Rdgs.

   F. Ch.31-35: Arguments

  G. Ch. 36-42: Research

  H. Ch. 43-48: Literature

   I.  Ch. 49-58: Majors & Work

Part III. Grammar 

   www.OnlineGrammar.org
 
---

 Study Questions
     

 

                                                      

Section I. WRITING FOR MAJORS & WORK

---
    

WRITING IN THE DISCIPLINES AND AS A PROFESSIONAL

This "Writing for Majors and Work" section shows you how to write for several primary undergraduate majors and graduate disciplines, and as a professional performing a variety of business and professional writing tasks at whatever job you might choose.  Though some of the methods and papers in his section can, of course, have informal, rough-draft or conversational usages, most become very formal scholarly, scientific, or professional documents requiring careful research and writing. 

This is a long section: it is because there are two groups of chapters, one on writing in several college and academic disciplines, and the other on professional types of papers for the workplace.  Sometimes the two intermix and chapters cross over, which is why these chapters are in the same section.  The section has the following chapters:

I. "Writing for Majors & Work" Chapters:

 49. Case Study

 50. IMRaD Science Report

 51. Magazine/Nwsltr. Article

 52. News Article/Release

 53. Story Writing
 ---

 54. Applying for Jobs

 55. Process/Instructions

 56. Professional Report

 57. Professional Proposal

 58. Recommendation Report

There also are three related web chapters or pages:

Details & Images

Creating Websites

Leading Writing Groups
     
See also "How I Learned to Write Grant Proposals" immediately below.

---

How I Learned to Write Proposals

            I remember the first time I helped make a successful major professional grant proposal.  I was living in Little Falls, Minnesota, a town of 8,000.  I was a freelance writer at the time, writing for magazines, and already involved in small proposal writing: two or three times a month I would write a one-two page proposal to a magazine editor suggesting an article I could write for him or her.  

However, I had never written a successful proposal for a big cash grant.  I decided to read more on how to write proposals and look at some sample proposals for money.  My chance to help write a proposal for a cash grant came much sooner than I expected.  I ran into Sister Cecelia, a nun with her Ph.D. at the convent in Little Falls, when she and I were shopping at the food co-op.  She told me she was thinking of sending a grant proposal to the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), a big federal-government foundation in Washington, D.C.  She wanted to start a music program for children.  But, she said, getting a grant from the NEA wasn't easy.  All she wanted was the minimum amount you could ask for, which was $10,000.  But, she said, she had no idea how to do it, and she was thinking of giving up on it.  

Well, I told her, I had been studying how to write grant proposals, and I would be glad to help her.  She agreed, and we got together a couple of times to go over the materials sent by the NEA.  She wrote an initial draft, and I made a number of suggestions for how she could rewrite some parts, delete some, and add to others.  After a few more drafts, she felt we had it as right as we could.  She sent it in.  Several months later, she called and said that to her surprise and delight, the NEA actually had decided to award the $10,000 to her program.  And, she said, the competition had indeed been very stiff: her proposed music program was one of the very few throughout the whole country at that funding level to be accepted.  She asked me what she could pay me for my help.  I insisted that I needed nothing.  She offered me a night out for dinner, which I gladly accepted.

Even though I didn't take any pay from her, my study and my practice with Sister Cecelia paid off well later on.  I went on to successfully propose grants for more money than Sister Cecelia requested.  In the largest, I received about $140,000 in cash and $40,000 worth of slightly used computers for the English department in which I worked.  Receiving that grant also gave me a bigger raise that year than most of my colleagues got--my supervisor had been very impressed by my work on the grant.  

So, the obvious lesson here is that learning to write good proposals pays off.  The less obvious moral of this story is that writing proposals also can be a lot of fun--even with the hard work and research they often require.  The reason for the fun part of it is that you get to change something, to make something new or better.  In other words, you get to make a difference--in your workplace, in people's quality of living, or in your own work life.  This is, after all, how all workplaces, jobs, and businesses are created--through a series of proposals, formal or informal, that build upon each other.  Each one of them starts in the mind of someone who has a good idea and only needs to find a way to propose it.          

---

Return to top.

                 

    

         

I. WRITING FOR MAJORS & WORK

---

Chapters:

 49. Case Study

 50. IMRaD Science Report

 51. Magazine/Nwsltr. Article

 52. News Article/Release

 53. Story Writing
        ---

 54. Applying for Jobs

 55. Process/Instructions

 56. Professional Report

 57. Professional Proposal

 58. Recommendation Report

---

Related Chapters/Pages:

Details & Images

Creating Websites

Leading Writing Groups

                    

                    

 ---
 Related Links in
OnlineGrammar.org:

  16. Research Writing

  17. Citation & Documentation

  18. References & Resources

  19. Visual/Multimodal Design

  20. Major/Work Writing              

 

Updated 2 Aug. 2013

  

   

 

WritingforCollege.org also is at CollegeWriting.info and WforC.org

Natural URL: www.tc.umn.edu/~jewel001/CollegeWriting/home.htm
1st through 5th Editions:: Writing for School & Work, 1984-1998; CollegeWriting.info, 1998-2012.
6th Edition: 8-1-12, rev. 8-1-13.  Text, design, and photos copyright 2002-12 by R. Jewell or as noted.
Permission is hereby granted for nonprofit educational copying and use without a written request.
Images courtesy of Barry's Clip Art, Clip Art Warehouse, The Clip Art Universe, Clipart Collection, MS Clip Art Gallery and Design Gallery Live, School Discovery, and Web Clip Art
Click here to contact the author: Richard Jewell.  Questions and suggestions are welcome.