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PARTS & SECTIONS

Click on any  part or section below:

Part I. Basics/Process

  A. Chapters 1-6: Start

  B. Ch. 7-13: Organize

  C. Ch. 14-20: Revise/Edit

Part II. College Writing

   D. Ch. 21-23: What Is It?

   E. Ch. 24-30: Write on Rdgs.

   F. Ch.31-35: Arguments

  G. Ch. 36-42: Research

  H. Ch. 43-48: Literature

   I.  Ch. 49-58: Majors & Work

Part III. Grammar 

   www.OnlineGrammar.org
 
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 Study Questions
     

 

                                                                 

STUDY QUESTIONS

  

If your professor asks you to respond to the chapters in this book by writing about them, he or she may ask you to summarize what is in a chapter, or to write your own responses to it. It is best to do so evenly throughout the material you are expected to read: i.e., write a sentence or paragraph about every section of a chapter, to show you read every section.

 

Generally, writing about what you have read is, according to research, likely to increase your memory of it by two to four times (over just reading it). So, the main purpose of such assignments is for you to better absorb and remember the reading. A secondary purpose may be to show your writing to your professor so she knows you have read the material.

 

The chapter below offers alternative ways of writing about a chapter. You may, instead--by the professor's own requirement or by your choice--wish to use some of the questions or "prompts" below in this web page. They can help you decide what to write about.

 

These questions or prompts are divided into four different methods, below. When you are assigned a chapter to read, just choose one of these four methods for writing study notes about it.  (Note: unless you are summarizing, please use your "I" voice as you write (e.g., "I see/saw this," "I think/thought that").

Please note: many of the chapters that are on a particular type of paper to write--for example, an "analysis" or a "thesis"--usually have five separate web pages, not just the first page you come to. So, please check out the other web pages, as well. They are listed with web links in the right hand column (and sometimes at the very top of the first page).

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Introduction

What good is taking notes?  Research shows that note taking dramatically increases your chance of remembering ideas in the chapter--even if you never read them again and throw away the notes. (Of course, note taking helps even more if you review the notes once or twice, later.) 

In addition, study notes can replace the need to take quizzes to see whether you have read the materials.  As you write your study notes, try to have fun and be creative in your answers--you'll enjoy the process more (and probably remember more!). 

Why are four different ways of taking study notes shown here?  Each type is more suitable for different individuals, or even how you feel on a certain day or about a specific chapter. 

Simple Directions

First, be sure, at some point in reading these instructions, to look at the student-written sample paper. You may scroll down to it, below, or click here: Example of Answers to Study Questions "C."

Second, please note that this page and its lists of study questions is the same no matter what chapter you are reading: in other words, these study questions are for any kind of chapter you might be reading--there is only this one general "Study Questions" page. 

Third, the study questions below break down into four types. You may choose any one type--A, B, C, or D--that will work on the chapter you are reading:

CHOOSE ONE OF THESE FOUR METHODS OF WRITING NOTES:

A. For any chapter, you can simply give your own personal responses or reactions to at least six points in the chapter. Use your "I" voice often--"I thought this," I felt that," etc. (If the chapter has sample papers by students, be sure to include at least 2 points about a sample.)

Spread your six or more points over the entire reading assignment, so that your instructor can tell you read all of the assignment.

B. For any chapter, Instead, you can simply summarize the chapter by providing six or more points of summary (no "I" voice needed). (If the chapter has sample papers by students, be sure to include at least 2 points about a sample.)

Spread your six or more points over the entire reading assignment, so that your instructor can tell you read all of the assignment.

C. For chapters with sample papers by students at the chapter ends, you may offer 6+ thoughts about different parts of the chapter and of the sample papers, with a minimum of 2 points being about at least one of the sample papers. Use your "I" voice often--"I thought this," I liked that," etc.

Spread your 6+ points over the entire reading assignment, so that your instructor can tell you read all of the assignment.

D. For chapters with sample papers by students at the chapter ends, you can, instead, offer 6+ points of response or reaction to--or summary of--just the sample papers. If you do this, then write at least 2 points per sample paper--often there are two or three sample papers--with a total of 6+ points, total. And, as with the other options above, use your "I" voice (unless you are just summarizing).

Note: Spread your 6+ points over the entire assignment, so that your instructor can tell that you read all of the assignment.

Fourth, most students are able to complete this "Study Questions"/"Study Notes" assignment without reading further, except that you should be sure to look at the student-written sample paper by scrolling down to it, below, or clicking here: Example of Answers to Study Questions "C."

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Details

Do you want more details and some suggestions for getting started with writing your Study Questions/Study Notes? If so, here is some additional help.

Here are suggestions for each type--questions you may wish to answer. Choose "Set A," "Set B," "Set C," or "Set D." Do not choose more than one! 

In the lists of questions below, you can choose one question and use it on all 6+ points you make, or you can choose different questions for your 6+ different points.

Any Chapter (with or without Sample Papers):
You may use Study Questions "A" or "B" to take notes on any chapter you wish. 

(If there are sample papers at the end, be sure to have 2+ points on them, too.)

 

 

(click on) SET A:

What are your personal responses

to any type
of chapter
?

 

 

(click on) SET B:

What is your summary
of any type
of chapter
?

                                         

Example from a student of answers to "Study Questions."

 

 

Example of Answers to Study Questions "C."

                                      

A Chapter with Sample Papers:

If a chapter has one or more sample papers and is about how to write a single type of paper (for example, as in the "Thesis Paper" chapter), then you may instead--if you wish--use Study Questions "C" or "D."

 

 

(click on) SET C:

What are your thoughts
about the chapter's contents & its sample paper(s
)?

 

 

(click on) SET D:
What are your thoughts
about just the sample papers for this chapter?

                                         

"Set A": Write 6+ personal responses to any type of chapter.

  • Choose 6+ parts, ideas, or activities in the chapter.  These 6 or more parts should be well spread throughout the parts of the chapter--so you can demonstrate you have read the important pages (other than "Activities" in the chapter.  Then respond to each part.  How do you respond?  There are some prompts at the end of these "Set A" Directions; you may use one or more of the prompts, or others that are similar.

  • "I" VOICE: Write using your "I" voice: "I thought this," "I felt that," "I noticed this," "I wondered about that," etc.

  • WORD COUNT: Write a suggested total of 150 words or more on all the parts combined (or whatever amount your instructor requests).  Please do not count any of the questions below--just your own writing.

  • SEPARATED POINTS: Write them freely, but separate them clearly (use a bulleted list or separate paragraphs with a blank line between them, or start each response with a subtitle such as "Response 1," "Response 2," etc.) on a line by itself and a blank line before it.

  • COMPLETE SENTENCES: When you respond to each point, you should do so by writing at least one complete sentence, in order to maximize your development of your thoughts about the chapter.  You should show sufficient detail about all of the chapter's parts such that someone reading your comments can tell you have read all of the chapter (and any samples, if the chapter has samples).

  • TONE: Be as honest as you want in responding to the chapter, as long as you are polite and positive in tone.  You are not critiquing (explaining bad or good parts of) the chapter, but rather sharing your own experiences, thoughts, and feelings that the chapter makes you think about or recall.  

  • TITLE: For your instructor, be sure to write your name, her or his name, and the assignment name (and date, if required) at the top of your responses before turning them in. Your instructor might also ask you to state which type of responses--"A," "B," "C," or "D"--you are writing.

  • POSSIBLE QUESTIONS/PROMPTS YOU COULD ANSWER: (Choose freely--one or more--or use something similar.)

    • What ideas, examples, or methods throughout the chapter did you especially notice because they make a lot of sense to you?  Why and/or how?  

    • What is your experience with one or more of them?

    • What is your own explanation for or summary of them (in your own words)?

    • What variations, additions, further thoughts, or examples could you add to them that might help other students?

    • What are your personal experiences relating to this chapter?  What have you experienced, how or why, and what have you not? 

    • What have your friends or family experienced about the activities mentioned in the chapter?  How or why?

    • How do one or more parts of the chapter make you feel, positively or negatively?  How or why?

    • What kind of person would you be if you regularly experienced one or more of the activities mentioned in the chapter?  How or why?

    • How might you possibly change yourself in the coming months or years to make yourself into the kind of person who experiences in a positive way the activities mentioned in the chapter?

  • Be sure, if the chapter does have sample papers at its end, that you write at least 2+ points--in at least 50 words--about one or more of the samples.

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"Set B": Summarize 6+ important points or parts of any chapter.

  • Choose 6+ main, important points or parts in the chapter.  These 6 or more points/parts should be well spread throughout the chapter--so you can demonstrate you have read the entire chapter.  Then summarize each point or part.  How should you summarize?  There are some prompts at the end of these "Set B" Directions; you may use one or more of the prompts.

  • WORD COUNT: Write a suggested total of 150 words or more on all the parts combined (or whatever amount your instructor requests).  Please do not count any of the questions below--just your own writing.

  • SEPARATED POINTS: Write them freely, but separate them clearly (use a bulleted list or separate paragraphs with a blank line between them, or start each response with a subtitle such as "Response 1," "Response 2," etc.) on a line by itself and a blank line before it.

  • COMPLETE SENTENCES: When you respond to each point, you should do so by writing at least one complete sentence, in order to maximize your development of your thoughts about the chapter.  You should show sufficient detail about all of the chapter's parts such that someone reading your comments can tell you have read all of the chapter (and any samples, if the chapter has samples).

  • TONE: Be factual and logical.  You are not critiquing the chapter, but rather logically and fairly summarizing what it says.  

  • TITLE: For your instructor, be sure to write your name, her or his name, and the assignment name (and date, if required) at the top of your responses before turning them in. Your instructor might also ask you to state which type of responses--"A," "B," "C," or "D"--you are writing.

  • PROMPTS YOU COULD USE: 

    • You may write a sentence for every one to three screens, summarizing that screen or set of screens.

    • Instead, you may choose six to twelve points you think are important or major points, and write a sentence or two summarizing each one.

    • You also may, instead--if the chapter is divided into several distinct parts--write one or more sentences of summary of each part.  

  • Be sure, if the chapter does have sample papers at its end, that you write at least 2+ points--in at least 50 words--about one or more of the samples.

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"Set C": Read a chapter containing one or more sample student essays.  Then answer 6+ questions about the chapter AND its sample paper(s).

  • This option is only for the type of chapter that has four main parts clearly showing at the top of the beginning screen: ""Introduction," "Basics," "Advanced," "Activities," and "Samples."  Skip "Activities" and read the other four parts.  Note that you can use these "Set C" instructions ONLY for the chapters that have these five parts.

  • Choose 6+ questions from the list at the end of these directions. 

  • WORD COUNT: Write a total of 150 words or more: 100+ w. in answers and 50+ w. in discussing the samples.   (If you cut and paste the questions, you may count only your own, actual answers as part of your 150+ w.)

  • SEPARATED POINTS: Write them freely, but separate them clearly (use a bulleted list or separate paragraphs with a blank line between them, or start each response with a subtitle such as "Response 1," "Response 2," etc.) on a line by itself and a blank line before it.

  • "I" VOICE: Write using your "I" voice: "I thought this," "I felt that," "I noticed this," "I wondered about that," etc.

  • COMPLETE SENTENCES: When you respond to each point, you should do so by writing at least one complete sentence, in order to maximize your development of your thoughts about the chapter.  You should show sufficient detail about all of the chapter's parts such that someone reading your comments can tell you have read all of the chapter (and any samples, if the chapter has samples).

  • DESCRIPTION OF SAMPLES: Remember to write a brief description of of the sample papers, too: 50+ words of description. Be sure to explain what happens in the content of the sample--don't just say it's a "good sample with a good introduction, body sections, and conclusions Instead, give enough of the contents that your instructor can see that you actually read all of it.

  • TONE: Be as honest as you want in responding to the chapter, as long as you are polite and positive in tone.  You are not critiquing (explaining bad or good parts of) the chapter, but rather sharing your own experiences, thoughts, and feelings that the chapter makes you think about or recall.  

  • TITLE: For your instructor, be sure to write your name, her or his name, and the assignment name (and date, if required) at the top of your responses before turning them in. Your instructor might also ask you to state which type of responses--"A," "B," "C," or "D"--you are writing.

  • POSSIBLE QUESTIONS/PROMPTS YOU COULD USE: 

    1. Why is this type of paper written, and what kinds of readers does it have?

    2. What is a definition of this type of paper?  Answer this in your own words in one or more sentences each: 
          (a) describe what this chapter's type of paper is or does, 
          (b) suggest one or two similar types of papers or methods of communicating, and how this   
               chapter's paper differs from them, and 
          (c) mention an example or two.

    3. What is the primary organizational structure (the main body sections and/or related parts) of this paper? You may choose to answer this in a sentence, in outline form, or by drawing it and then writing the various parts into boxes, circles, or other "cluster" or "tree" diagrams.

    4. Check the "Table of Contents" ("WSW Home Page").  In your opinion, what other type of writing in this textbook (or elsewhere in life) would appear to be similar to this one, and why or how?  (If you are in the early part of the course, try to guess at some answers to this question.)

    5. Check the "Table of Contents" again.  In your opinion, what other type of writing in this book or in real life would appear to be very different from this one, and why or how?

    6. What is an example of a subject, problem, or issue that you as an individual might choose for a paper like this? (You may be imaginative in choosing an example.)

    7. Using the example from "6" above, what contents might you have for the organizational parts (introduction and body sections) of this paper? 

      Don't just answer this by saying things like "an introduction and three sections"; rather, suggest actual contents.  If, for example, you were exemplifying a thesis paper, your answer to this question might be to write four sentences as follows: 

      1. Introduction: Children should be more respectful of each other."  (main subject sentence)
        Section 1:
        "First, this is true because respect allows for an atmosphere of trust."  (topic sentence 1)
        Section 2:
        "Second, this is true because respect encourages emotional growth."  (topic sentence 2)
        Section 3:
        "Third, respect causes more intellectual interaction."  (topic sentence 3)

      Please answer this in outline or list form, as done above, with the name of each section underlined: e.g., "Introduction," "Section 1," etc., and your contents sentences--your main subject sentence and your topic sentences--afterwards.

    8. Does this type of paper, according to the chapter, probably require a lot or a little revision for you?  Why and/or how?  What kinds of things especially may need revising in this type of paper, according to the chapter?

    9. How do you feel about this kind of paper, and why or in what way?

    10. Consider one or more of the special "critical thinking" points, if this chapter has them.  What do you like or dislike about one or more of them?  Why?

    11. Have you done any type of writing in the past like the writing described in this chapter?  Why and how?  Describe both similarities and differences between that experience and what is described in this chapter.

    12. If you were a teacher, what are some questions that you could ask about the contents of this chapter for discussion by your students?  What kinds qustions might lead the students to more deeply connect the chapter's contents with their own work?

    13. What are some key words in this chapter, what do the words mean, and why or how are they used in the chapter?

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"Set D": Read a chapter containing one or more sample student essays.  Then answer 6+ questions about just the sample papers (all of them).

  • This option is only for the type of chapter that has five parts--five web pages--clearly showing at the top of the beginning screen: "Introduction," "Basics," "Advanced," "Activities," and "Samples."  Read the four main parts (skip "Activities"). these four parts. You can only use these "Set D" when there is a chapter with five main web pages in it. (Do not use "Set D" for general or introductory chapters without these five main parts.)

  • Choose 6+ parts, ideas, or activities in the chapter.  These 6 or more parts should be well spread throughout the parts of the chapter--so you can demonstrate you have read the important pages (other than "Activities" in the chapter.  Then respond to each part.  How do you respond?  There are some prompts at the end of these "Set A" Directions; you may use one or more of the prompts, or others that are similar.

  • "I" VOICE: Write using your "I" voice: "I thought this," "I felt that," "I noticed this," "I wondered about that," etc.

  • WORD COUNT: Write a suggested total of 150 words or more on all the parts combined (or whatever amount your instructor requests).  Please do not count any of the questions below--just your own writing.

  • SEPARATED POINTS: Write them freely, but separate them clearly (use a bulleted list or separate paragraphs with a blank line between them, or start each response with a subtitle such as "Response 1," "Response 2," etc.) on a line by itself and a blank line before it.

  • COMPLETE SENTENCES: When you respond to each point, you should do so by writing at least one complete sentence, in order to maximize your development of your thoughts about the chapter.  You should show sufficient detail about all of the chapter's parts such that someone reading your comments can tell you have read all of the chapter (and any samples, if the chapter has samples).

  • TONE: Be as honest as you want in responding to the chapter, as long as you are polite and positive in tone.  You are not critiquing (explaining bad or good parts of) the chapter, but rather sharing your own experiences, thoughts, and feelings that the chapter makes you think about or recall.  

  • TITLE: For your instructor, be sure to write your name, her or his name, and the assignment name (and date, if required) at the top of your responses before turning them in. Your instructor might also ask you to state which type of responses--"A," "B," "C," or "D"--you are writing.

  • QUESTIONS/PROMPTS YOU COULD USE: 

    1. What is the key/primary/central thesis or problem-and-solution of each sample paper?

    2. What central/primary groupings or overall structures of ideas, facts, examples, sub-arguments, research, etc. are used in each sample paper to support the central thesis or problem and solution?

    3. Who or what is the natural--the normally expected or assumed--audience for each sample (other than "the teacher")?

    4.  What would appear to be the normal position, jobs, levels, and/or types of writers of the samples?

    5. What is the primary tension in each sample?  That is, what is the problem that the paper seems to be fighting against, disagreeing about, or trying to resolve?  (The tensions can be intellectual problems or real job- or life-related ones, depending on the types of samples.)

    6. What would appear to be the writers' normal main purposes in writing these sample papers (other than "to get a grade," etc.)--what do they hope to accomplish?

    7. What kinds of goals, results, or outcomes do the writers seem to have in their samples?

    8. What styles or tones do the writers use in their samples: give an example or two of each and explain what kind of style/tone it is.  (E.g., an academic paper might have a strict factual tone, a strongly argumentative one, a friendly or neutral one; what tones are there, what examples can you give, and how/why are the writers using these tones to accomplish their goals or purposes in writing the sample papers?)

    9. How do the writers use the mechanics of word choice in each sample: what types, lengths, and simplicities/difficulties of words are used, and why/how?

    10. How do the writers use the mechanics of sentences in each sample: what types, lengths, and simplicities/difficulties of sentences are used, how are typical sentences developed from first sentence to last, and why/how?

    11. How do the writers use the mechanics of paragraphing in each sample: what types, lengths, and simplicities/difficulties of paragraphing are used, how are typical paragraphs developed from first sentence to last, and why/how?

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Sample Paper (for "Set C") Written by a Student

                

Note: You may copy the questions above, if you wish, when you write your responses.  However, you cannot count the questions as part of the word count you must write for your responses.  For example, if you are required to write 150 words or more of your own responses, then this means 150+ words in addition to the questions from above.      

Elizabeth Peterson
For Jewell, English 1114, 4:15 PM
Fall, Sect. 2, Week 2

Study Questions, 150+ w. (245 w.)
Chapter C4: Writing an Analysis Paper

Set C:  Answers and Summary of Sample

(Note: The original Study Questions are in italics.)

  • Why is this type of paper written, and what kinds of readers does it have?  My understanding of this chapter is that an analysis paper is written to give an unbiased review of a text, person, place, event, etc. using a specific theory.  It is typically read by an instructor in an educational environment.  

  • What is the primary organizational structure of this paper?
    (a) Introduction: subject being studied along with the main theory used to analyze it and some introductory details
    (b) Body sections: three or four body sections with analyses in each
    (c) Conclusion: subject being studied along with the main theory used to analyze it and some closing details

  • What is an example of a subject, problem, or issue that you as an individual might choose for a paper like this?  A good example that I would use to write a thorough analysis paper would maybe be Shakespeare’s Hamlet because of I could examine the underlying social and mental issues in the play.

  • What other types of writing in this textbook would appear to be similar to this one?   I think a summary of a reading, a disagreement with a reading, a critical review of a reading, and an evaluation of a reading are all similar to an analysis of a reading.

  • What other types of writing in this textbook would appear to be very different from this one?  I think a thesis essay, a dialectic argument, a literary thesis, a magazine article, and a professional proposal are all very different from an analysis paper.

  • Have you done any type of writing in the past like the type of paper described in this chapter?  Why and how?  I have done similar writing to this in the past.  In an English class I had in high school I had to analyze various works of several Elizabethan authors.

  • First point about student sample: I like the student sample paper in this chapter that analyzes an article about the death penalty.  One reason I think it's well done is because the sample paper clearly states the main purpose.

  • Second point about a student sample: Another reason is that the paper then goes into detail describing the views on the death penalty from the point of view of a working man, a poor person, and a politician.  In my opinion, it probably  is an unbiased and concise view on the article it is analyzing.

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This page was made with thanks to an oral conversation with Michael Berndt, Normandale Community College, for "B. 12"; and to Leslie Caferelli's "Writing to assist processing" (private handout) for "C. 13."

Sample paper: Copyright 2009 by Elizabeth Peterson.  All rights reserved except for free use with this online textbook as outlined on the home page.  Please do not copy this sample paper in any other form than this web page without explicit permission from the author or editor.

                                   

                 

    

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Updated 29 Jan. 2017

  

   

 

WritingforCollege.org also is at CollegeWriting.info and WforC.org

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1st through 5th Editions:: Writing for School & Work, 1984-1998; CollegeWriting.info, 1998-2012.
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